1. “Corridors of Time” – Chrono Trigger (1995)

 Chrono Trigger has one of the finest soundtracks of any game I’ve played, so choosing just one track was a bit difficult. Since the game deals with time travel, I feel “Corridors of Time” perfectly showcases the sensation of traveling to another world. The song plays in the kingdom of Zeal, a city that floats above the clouds. It marks a big turning point in the game, and the story really starts to pick up during this section. The track itself stands out for its ascending notes, vocal sound fonts, and an overall “Zen-like” atmosphere.

 

  1. “Gusty Garden Galaxy” – Super Mario Galaxy (2007)

 This may very well be the unofficial anthem of Nintendo during the Wii era. While the level itself is plenty of fun, the music is what really makes this part of the game stand out. Mario games didn’t traditionally embrace orchestral pieces before the release of Galaxy, especially to this degree. The use of strings, brass, and a triumphant percussion keeps the rhythm going, while Mario jumps his way around various grassy planetoids. Even a decade after the game’s release, I still think Galaxy has the best overall soundtrack from a Mario game, and this song is a true highlight.

 

 

  1. “Dire Dire Docks” – Super Mario 64 (1996)

Traveling back over a decade before my previous entry, Super Mario 64 is generally known for a catchy, upbeat soundtrack. However, “Dire Dire Docks” perhaps embodies nostalgia in its purest form. While I didn’t grow up playing the game when it first released, I did play the DS version of the game back around 2005. Even coming from the smaller speakers of the DS, this song really stood out to me for setting a soothing tone to the game’s world. My favorite section is when the drums begin to kick in, completely changing the feel of the song. Considering how much everyone dreads water levels in video games, I think this track helped make Mario’s underwater adventure a bit less stressful.

 

 

  1. “Ruins” – Kirby 64 (2000)

It’s hard to believe this track comes from a Kirby game. That’s not to say the games don’t have plenty of great soundtracks, but I can’t think of many songs in the series that sound this atmospheric. It plays only a few times in Kirby 64, generally during a desert or underwater level. I love the echo effect that the bell chimes have, along with the use of synthesized strings as the song builds up. It all adds up to an emotionally powerful tune; for a series that usually goes for a catchy “pop” style, it’s a welcomed surprise.

 

  1. “Sona Mi Areru Ec Sancitu” – Panzer Dragoon Saga (1998)

 Panzer Dragoon Saga is, quite possibly, one of the greatest video games of all time that, sadly, not many people have had the chance to play. It’s an incredibly rare title that released at a time when the Sega Saturn was starting to lose its relevancy. This track plays during the ending credits, bringing the game’s somewhat sorrowful ending a last bit of hope. The song uses the game’s fictional language, “panzerese,” which borrows characteristics from Latin. It combines tribal drumbeats, a strong brass section, and a fairly unique vocal style to really bring out the otherworldly feel that the game presents.

It’s a tough call to make, but I think if I had to choose one dream arrangement for MGSO to perform, this would probably be it.

 

 

  1. “Dear to the Heart” – Final Fantasy 7 (1997)

 Sure, this song is essentially just another arrangement of the main Final Fantasy 7 theme, but it’s still my favorite from the game. Final Fantasy 7 is also my favorite video game of all time, and this track serves to remind me of all the memories I’ve had with it. Though the song appears several times in the game, my favorite moment is when the main cast of characters is finally about to leave the city of Midgar and explore the rest of the world. That’s right, there’s still another thirty hours or so of story content after Midgar! The game’s story can be pretty tragic at times, but this song always lets the player know that there is still some beauty left in its world; you just have to chase Sephiroth for several hours before you find it.

 

 

  1. “Multi-Man Melee 1” – Super Smash Bros. Melee (2001)

Huh? Super Smash Bros. Melee has twenty-nine playable stages? Who needs those other stages when you’ve got this awesome track playing on Battlefield! I’m not usually into competitive gaming, but Melee is an exception. Every time I sit down to practice, I need to play on Battlefield so I can hear this song. The synthesized guitar solo is permanently engraved in my mind as one of the coolest riffs in gaming. Set the stock count to 99,  hold the L or R button when choosing the stage, and get ready for hours of intense button clicking.

 

 

  1. “The Crystal Stars” – Paper Mario: the Thousand-Year Door (2004)

 I won’t spoil the ending for anyone who hasn’t played the Thousand-Year Door, but I will say that this track plays during a rather triumphant moment in the final boss fight. Having played the game when it first released in 2004, I’ve always had a soft spot for this song over the years. This track serves as a reminder that, though you’ve still got an incredibly daunting opponent left to fight, all the characters you befriended along the way have your back. It would be nice if they could do more than just cheer you on, but it’s the thought that counts!

 

 

  1. “Lofty Castle” – Spyro the Dragon (1998)

 The Spyro franchise may not be around today, but during the late 90’s it was one of the top 3D platforming series. Stewart Copeland, the drummer for the popular rock group, The Police, composed the soundtrack. Copeland utilized synthesizers, electric guitar, piano, and of course his remarkable drumming skills. “Lofty Castle,” in particular, sounds quite different from the other songs in the game. The level itself has a dreamlike atmosphere, with pink skies and flying pigs (which I used to think looked like turkeys for some reason). Unlike some of the other songs in the game, piano is the primary instrument on display here; it’s played in a fairly unique style, and I still haven’t been able to figure out how to replicate it properly.

 

 

  1. “Undertale (Main Theme)” – Undertale (2015)

 Before I played Undertale, I didn’t really have any expectations in advance; my only prior knowledge of the game was that it was a turn-based RPG where you didn’t have to kill any of the enemies. Oh, and apparently it was similar to EarthBound, a game I already had a ton of appreciation for. On my first playthrough, I opted for the “pacifist route,” where I wouldn’t have to hurt any enemies, or other characters in the game. It made the game’s tone a lot happier, and kept me motivated to continue befriending every character I met. It took only a few short hours, but I was beginning to reach what I believed to be the final section of the game (though I’d later find out that wasn’t quite the case). I had made my way to the home of the supposed main villain, Asgore, and anticipated an immediate battle.

As I approached the closest save point, a soft guitar began to play a familiar leitmotif from past sections of the game. It looped a few times, before a timid piano was added, and finally some strings and percussion. I had to take a moment to sit back and appreciate what I was hearing; it was such a simple melody, and yet it worked so perfectly within the context of the game. Undertale loves to go against the player’s expectations. It doesn’t just throw you into an epic final boss fight right away. Instead, it gives you time to let the results of your journey sink in. What kind of player were you? Did you fight every enemy you encountered, or only a few? Or, did you spare every enemy instead? I sure knew what kind of player I was…I was the one who started bawling when this song played.

In a few of these entries, I‘ve talked about nostalgia, and how certain tracks, even if you didn’t grow up hearing them, can still bring you back to earlier moments in your life. To me, that’s exactly what the main theme of Undertale manages to do. It may sound somber in its first few measures, but the final key change ends everything on a positive note. It assures you that, though your journey is coming to an end, there were plenty of memories made along the way.

The main theme from Undertale evokes a powerful essence of innocence and love that few songs have managed to match for me, video game soundtrack or otherwise.